Jueves, 23 Marcha, 2017

Travel-related measles case confirmed in Nova Scotia: health authority

A low-pressure system moving into Nova Scotia on Sunday afternoon will bring snow and freezing rain an Environment Canada forecast says A low-pressure system moving into Nova Scotia on Sunday afternoon will bring snow and freezing rain an Environment Canada forecast says
Manuel Armenta | 21 Marcha, 2017, 02:52

Nova Scotia health officials are trying to track down people who may have been exposed to the measles virus earlier this month.

"We were notified last week that we had a laboratory-confirmed case of measles of someone who was travelling internationally", said Dr. Ryan Sommers, a regional medical officer of health with the Nova Scotia Health Authority.

People who travelled on WestJet flight WS254, which departed Toronto on March 10 at 9:35 p.m. and arrived in Halifax at 12:32 a.m. on March 11, may have been exposed.

The arrivals area at Halifax Stanfield International Airport on March 11 from 12:30 a.m.to 3 a.m.

St. Jerome's Catholic Church in West Caledonia - March 11 from 1:45 p.m.to 5 p.m.

South Shore Regional Hospital emergency department from 2:30 p.m. March 12 to 9 p.m. on March 15.

Those exposed at the above locations may develop symptoms between now and April 5, the release said.

Symptoms can include fever, cough, runny nose, red eyes, sleepiness, irritability, small white spots that could show up in the mouth and throat, and a red blotchy rash on the face which can spread down the body.

People with these symptoms can call Public Health at 1-844-856-3677 or 811 for advice from a registered nurse.

Public Health has directly notified family members and friends of those known to have had close contact with the case.

"The other cases we weren't exactly sure if it was associated with global travel, it's something that's still being investigated", Sommers said.

In Nova Scotia, the last travel-related measles case was reported in 2008.

People typically recover from measles within two to three weeks, but it is an illness that can cause serious complications, more often in infants, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems, the health authority says.