Domingo, 18 Marcha, 2018

Watch First 360-Degree Launch Broadcast

ZBOT experiment Space station supply ship at launch pad honors John Glenn
Ramiro Mantilla | 19 Abril, 2017, 08:18

Nasa will for the first time will air a 360-degree live coverage of an Orbital Cygnus spacecraft's resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS).

The livestream will begin 10 minutes prior to the spacecraft's departure, which is now scheduled to take place within a 30-minute window between 11:11 11:41 a.m.

The cargo launch had been planned for last month, but ULA, a partnership of Lockheed Martin and Boeing, delayed the mission due to an issue with the Atlas rocket's hydraulic system.

Running almost a month late because of hydraulic problems, an Atlas 5 rocket was hauled to its Florida launch pad Monday, setting the stage for blastoff Tuesday on a mission to boost a space station-bound Orbital ATK Cygnus cargo ship into orbit.

Tuesday's launch of supplies from Cape Canaveral is a part of NASA's commercial cargo program, a partnership with private companies to supply the station. Viewers may use the YouTube app to view the launch on a smartphone. Cygnus will carry the Spacecraft Fire Experiment-III (Saffire-III) marking the third time that the spacecraft has been used for these investigations as a unique environment to study fires in microgravity. "It's a great tribute to John to be able to take his name to orbit once again". Atlas V rocket, the spacecraft is set to launch, carrying more than 7,500 pounds of supplies and equipment to the International Space Station (ISS). For the first time ever the space agency will broadcast a launch live online in 360 degrees.

The next Cygnus flight, OA-8E, is planned for October 2017.

The AF is also predicting the same 90 percent chance of "go" conditions at launch time.

Once attached and leak checks between the hatches of the station and spacecraft are conducted, the crew will open the hatch and begin unloading the cargo and experiments.

The cargo ship is named after John Glenn, the famed astronauts who was the first American to orbit the Earth and who died a year ago at age 95. "We will review today's 360º setup and endeavor to bring this new perspective of a rocket launch to everyone in the future". NASA later bought three additional flights and Orbital won a second contract for at least six more missions through 2024. These include over 7,600 pounds (3,447 kg) of science research, hardware to the orbiting laboratory and crew supplies.