Jueves, 25 May, 2017

Former FBI director James Comey agrees to testify before Senate Intelligence Committee

Former FBI Director James Comey will testify before Senate intelligence committee Ex-FBI Director James Comey To Testify In Public Senate Hearing
Eleena Tovar | 20 May, 2017, 12:20

Former FBI Director James Comey has agreed to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee in an open session.

"There is no reason he can't testify before both the Intelligence and Judiciary Committees, particularly given that the Judiciary Committee is the FBI's primary oversight committee", Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and ranking Democrat Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., wrote in a statement.

"This new report that President Trump openly admitted to the Russians that he "faced great pressure" from the FBI's criminal investigation that was "taken off" when he fired Director Comey is astonishing - and extremely troubling", Cummings said in a statement.

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"The Committee looks forward to receiving testimony from the former Director on his role in the development of the Intelligence Community Assessment on Russian interference in the 2016 USA elections, and I am hopeful that he will clarify for the American people recent events that have been broadly reported in the media", Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., said in a statement released Friday evening.

The President also dismissed reports that he demanded loyalty pledge from former FBI Director James Comey at a private dinner.Trump responded saying, "No, I didn't but I think loyalty to the country, loyalty to the U.S.is important". After the firing, associates of Comey leaked a February memo the FBI director had written describing a conversation in which Trump asked him to drop an investigation into former White House national security adviser Michael Flynn's dealings with Turkey and Russian Federation.

The development will come as blow to White House efforts to dampen down interest in the Russian Federation investigation as Mr Trump jetted off to Saudi Arabia on his first foreign trip as president.

The president himself labeled the ongoing Federal Bureau of Investigation probe a "witch hunt" this week after the Justice Department appointed a special counsel to oversee it in the wake of Comey's firing.

Graham said he was "surprised" Comey would agree to testify at all, "given the fact that we now have a Special Counsel who will likely be investigating matters related" to his conversations with Trump.

Trump told Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov last week that Comey was a "nut job", according to the Times, citing notes taken at the meeting and read to the paper by a United States official.

Citing two unidentified sources, CNN also reported that White House lawyers have begun researching impeachment procedures in an effort to prepare for what officials still believe is a distant possibility that Trump could have to fend off attempts to remove him from office. I faced great pressure because of Russian Federation.

White House aides initially said that Trump fired him on the recommendation of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein over Comey's handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails, but the President later contradicted his aides and said he had already planned to fire Comey.

Trump has denied allegations of any type of collusion between his campaign officials and Russian operatives.

"There is no collusion between certainly myself and my campaign, but I can always speak for myself, and the Russians - zero", Trump told reporters.

Spicer offered a new explanation for the firing, saying that Trump had been trying to improve relations with Russian Federation - and Comey got in the way.